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Courses & Curriculum

Course descriptions include prerequisites as well as the semester(s) when each course is offered.

AAS Degree Program

Professional Courses

This course measures the ability of students to understand information from biomedical, dental and dental hygiene sciences. The course also assesses the student's ability to apply this information in a problem-solving context.

(Fall, Summer)

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts and terminology of general chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry, and to provide the foundation for further study of nutrition, physiology, and dental materials.

(Fall, Spring)

A study of the compositions and properties of materials used in the contemporary practice of dentistry. Background knowledge and practical experience are provided. Laboratory sessions are integrated with lectures of introductory techniques of manipulation of these materials to be used in a clinical setting.

(Spring)

Study of fundamental disease processes and specific diseases of the oral region; survey of systemic diseases by organ systems; oral abnormalities, including aspects of treatment, are discussed in conjunction with general topics of cell injury, inflammation, neoplasia, and genetic diseases. Emphasis is placed on the effects of systemic diseases on the dental patient.

(Fall, Summer)

This course focuses on the study of the structure and functions of the human body, integrated with other dental sciences and dental applications.

(Fall)

This courses focuses on anatomy of the human body with emphasis on the head, neck, and oral cavity. Other topics include histology, anatomy and physiology of bones, muscles, blood, and nervous systems.

(Spring)

This course focuses on the study of the principles of microbiology including the transmission, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of systemic and oral diseases.

(Fall)

This is a continuation of Microbiology I with a focus on the prevention of systemic and oral diseases.

(Spring)

Fundamental principles of biochemistry and other basic science courses are coordinated with the study of nutrients and their relationship to health. This course offers a theoretical and practical study of fats, carbohydrates, proteins, minerals, vitamins, and water and how they affect the status of an individual’s oral health.

(Fall)

Through lecture, laboratory and independent study, the student is provided the opportunity to learn the development, structure, morphology, eruption, and functions of the primary and permanent dentitions.

(Fall)

This course covers both general and oral histology. Introductory lectures in general histology and embryology, followed by a study of the fundamentals of histology and embryology of the head, neck, and oral cavity.

(Spring, Summer)

Principles, practices, methods, and audiovisual materials are used in teaching dental health education to the public in schools and or in community public health institutions. Practical applications are provided by assuming responsibilities for designing, implementing, and assessing community dental health programs.

(Spring)

This course is designed to teach the student management of pain control through the use of local anesthetic agents and the administration of nitrous oxide and oxygen when used as a sedative. The physiology and pharmacology agents, indications and contraindications for use, and the treatment of complications and emergencies are stressed. Other modalities of pain control will be discussed.

(Spring)

A theoretical and practical study of the various concepts and methods used in describing, preventing, and controlling periodontal disease. Diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of the diseases are presented.

(Spring)

 

Lectures consider both theoretical and practical aspects of drug use. Initial discussions center on those principles that control the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of drugs. In subsequent lectures, the pharmacology of individual drug groups is presented. Their cellular actions, therapeutic uses, and adverse effects are discussed. Emphasis is placed on those drugs of greatest medical use.

(Fall)

An introduction to current principles and issues in public health and their relationship to the delivery of dental care to the public. Students learn basic concepts of health care organization, epidemiology, statistics, program planning, and prevention of dental diseases. Future roles for dental health care providers in a changing health care system are investigated. The role of preventive dentistry in clinical practice is discussed.

(Fall)

Through lecture and laboratory experiences, the student becomes knowledgeable and develops proficiency in providing comprehensive dental hygiene treatment, patient education, and management. Subjects covered are oral inspection, charting, recording medical and dental histories, sterilization, hard and soft deposits, stains, fluoride mechanisms, instrument sharpening, dental and medical emergencies, and oral physiotherapy.

(Fall)

The clinic correlates knowledge from the didactic portion of the course to conduction of oral health services on clinic partners. All clinic skills are practiced to proficiency. Students will be certified in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

(Fall)

This course is a continuation of Principles of Dental Hygiene I. The lectures include slide presentations and discussions on various oral manifestations seen in the oral cavity. Some systemic disease processes that have intraoral signs and symptoms are also covered.

(Spring)

This clinic develops professional knowledge and the refinement of techniques required in providing comprehensive dental hygiene treatment to patients. Rotating assignments in dental school clinics provide an opportunity to learn about the responsibilities of various members of the dental health team.

(Spring)

Through lecture, discussions, reading assignments, and research projects, the students continue to develop professional judgment and skills in providing optimal comprehensive dental hygiene patient treatment.

(Fall)

Students continue to develop professional judgment and clinical skills by providing comprehensive dental hygiene treatment including expanded functions to clinic patients and on extramural rotation assignments.

(Fall, Spring*)

*Spring Session 1 credit evening students only

Through lectures, discussions, readings, and writing assignments, the student develops knowledge of ethical and legal issues, professional organizations, résumé writing, job interview techniques, dental office procedures, and management.

(Spring)

The students continue to develop their cognitive and psychomotor skills in providing preventive dental hygiene services, expanded functions, and nutritional counseling to clinic patients as well as to patients treated through extramural rotation assignments.

(Spring)

Through the use of lectures, slides, and laboratory experiences, this course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of radiation biology, radiation protection, radiographic image receptors, the developing process, and the fundamentals of dental radiography including the projection and production of X-rays. Normal radiographic anatomy, as well as caries detection and the radiographic evaluation of periodontal disease, are discussed. Students learn radiographic techniques on manikins and then proceed to take radiographs for the clinic patients.

(Fall)

 

Liberal Arts Courses

The College of Dentistry and the Paul McGhee Division work cooperatively to offer these courses through NYU's School of Continuing and Professional Studies. Students are recommended to take these courses according to their specific track guidelines.

This course is designed to provide the student with a legal and ethical framework. Students explore the responsibilities involved in hygienist/patient and employee/employer relationships. The legal ramifications of a variety of practice settings are investigated. Through case studies, ethical and professional development is encouraged.

(Spring)

 

The courses listed below are usually offered throughout the academic year.

Intended for students whose Writing Placement Essays indicate that they require more preparation for Writing Workshop I. Students learn to generate ideas; shape and support a thesis; and gain further control over sentence structure, word choice, and grammar. Students also read and analyze various texts to help them, and familiarize themselves with standard English practices. (This course may be taken twice if necessary.)

This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of psychology, with emphasis on psychology's major areas of study: personality development, learning, social psychology, physiology, and motivation. Current schools of thought are examined in an historical context. Psychoanalytic, behavioral, humanistic, and cognitive approaches to psychology are reviewed.

This course is a study of society, groups, and cultures and an introduction to sociological theory as a means for interpreting and understanding human behavior and the human condition. Topics of discussion include the process of social and cultural change, social structure and stratification, roles and gender, the family, and social control.

A study of the dynamics of the communications process and a workshop in developing effective communications skills. Emphasis is on a wide range of behaviors and situations, from one-to-one interactions to formal presentations.

This course focuses on the individual student's writing and reading skills. Writing is presented as an ongoing evolutionary process. The class emphasizes strategies for generating and clarifying ideas; refining analytical thinking; using evidence effectively; controlling detail and generalization; and developing a sense of audience. Students also become familiar with the skills needed for library research.

This second-level course emphasizes the development of a personal voice, control of style, and independent analytical thinking, while continuing to build confidence and fluency. Analytical thinking is stressed, as is the use of evidence in the context of research and other academic writing. Students expand their information retrieval and research skills.

NOTE: All prerequisite courses must be successfully completed before higher level courses may be taken, unless special permission is given by the Director of the Dental Hygiene Program.

 

BS Degree Program

BS Track A curriculum also includes all courses listed to the left in the AAS section.  

Core Courses

This course covers various types of business writing: letters, reports, memos, proposals and manuals. In writing reports, the model of the corporate annual report is used. In writing proposals, both solicited and unsolicited proposals are covered. In writing manuals, students learn how to compile technical information and provide graphic support.

(Fall, Spring) Online course

This course is designed to instruct students on how to use statistics for data analysis. The course will make use of SPSS, a statistical software package (Versions 10 or higher.) The first semester will serve as a foundation, covering methods for displaying and describing data.

(Fall, Spring)

This course introduces students to the most essential and current concepts of information technology. Students learn basic fundamentals of computer hardware and application software. Utilizing the most contemporary online learning technology, students will have experience using Microsoft Office applications – Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

(Fall) Online

This course emphasizes analytic thinking by reading texts and being able to evaluate them critically, to analyze structure and their appeals to logic and emotion, to develop criteria for effectively evaluating writing, and to recognize and discuss the many qualities which contribute to effective critical thinking by others, including classmates.

(Fall, Spring)

This course is designed to explore the concepts of cultural competence as related to the delivery of health care. The students move along a cultural competence continuum towards cultural proficiency. Self assessment is critical to understanding and applying the concepts.

(Fall, Summer) Online  

This course consists of fieldwork in areas such as dental research, teaching and dental auxiliary programs, administration of dental facilities and dental health education in selected settings, and business affiliations. Students develop a learning proposal and evaluation mechanism. Fieldwork can occur on or off campus. Faculty advisor approval required prior to registration. Minimum of 50 hours per 3 credit sections, directly supervised each term. Paper required.

(Fall, Spring, Summer)

This is an introductory course designed to provide future healthcare decision makers with foundation of knowledge about the US healthcare delivery system. Some of the topics addressed include the history, financing, and delivery models of health care.

(Spring)

The course provides an overview of the ways that health professionals collect information and the application to the delivery of health care. A combination of approaches is used, including readings about and discussions of research methods; a series of learning activities to provide practical experience in research methods; analyzing research methods examples; and preparing elements of a research proposal. In addition, the course is designed to help provide students with the foundation for locating and evaluating scientific information, and to become informed consumers of completed research.

(Spring, Summer)

This course is designed to teach the student management of pain control through the use of local anesthetic agents and the administration of nitrous oxide and oxygen when used as a sedative. The physiology and pharmacology agents, indications and contraindications for use, and the treatment of complications and emergencies are stressed. Other modalities of pain control will be discussed.

(Spring)

 

Elective Courses

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of dental health teaching and evaluation. Emphasis is placed on behavioral objectives, assessment of instructional procedures, and evaluations. Practical application is provided through assignments and mini-class lecturing.

(Fall)

The Dental Hygiene Accreditation Guidelines are presented with special emphasis on clinical requirements and their application to preclinical curriculum. Strategies for teaching clinical dental hygiene procedures are presented, with application and teaching experience provided through instruction of students enrolled in a preclinical course.

(Spring)

As healthcare moves toward a more integrative model, career opportunities for dental hygienists in community & public health sectors will expand. This online course outlines the history, evolution and status of health in various levels of community. Students will have the opportunity to gain advanced knowledge of public health issues and initiatives by examining local, state and federal health resources, health objectives for the nation, program planning, promotion, and disease prevention in all aspects of health. Topics include epidemiology, environmental health, drugs, safety, and occupational health. Activities include web based assignments, discussions, lectures, student presentations, in addition to exploring existing community agencies and programs.

(Fall) Online

This course is designed to integrate dental hygiene knowledge, apply it and prepare for: the forensic needs of the community, detection and prevention of abuses of humanity, and develop a community advocate who is prepared to play an active role in times of catastrophe.

(Spring)

This course will prepare students for advanced roles in dental hygiene oral health care through a collaborative approach of theory, research and clinical practice. Students will gain in-depth knowledge of the aging process and develop clinical skills necessary for complete health assessment and management of oral issues. The coursework will explore foundational knowledge in healthful aging as well as issues related to chronic illness in the geriatric population. Principles of evidence-based research and practice will be utilized to explore the oral health problems unique to geriatric patients. Students will analyze public policy and the impact of limited access to care.

(Spring)

Minimum of 15 hours per point. Cannot be used to satisfy the required dental specialty or Liberal Education Plan requirements. Formal registration and prior faculty approval are required.

(Offered as needed)

In this distance learning course, students will study international oral health and the role of the dental hygienist profession in an international perspective. The studies are problem-based and students will study in a team together with students from different countries. Each team will produce a PowerPoint presentation to be presented at a given date in June. A web-based learning platform will be used. Students must download Skype and ensure they have a working microphone and web camera.

(Spring) Online

This course explores the bio-psychosocial dimensions of Women's health. The course will examine the many factors affecting the health and well-being of women throughout their lifespan. Prevention, health promotion, research, and clinical intervention are the foundations of this course.

(Spring) Online

 

Additional BS Curriculum Requirements

The College of Dentistry and the Paul McGhee Division work cooperatively to offer these courses through NYU's School of Professional Studies. Students are recommended to take these courses according to their specific track guidelines.

The courses listed below are usually offered throughout the academic year. **Prerequisites will be defined per class through the School of Professional Studies. Please review prerequisite requirements before enrolling.

**Prerequisites will be defined per class through the School of Professional Studies. Please review prerequisite requirements before enrolling.

**Prerequisites will be defined per class through the School of Professional Studies. Please review prerequisite requirements before enrolling.

**Prerequisites will be defined per class through the School of Professional Studies. Please review prerequisite requirements before enrolling.

 

NOTE: All prerequisite courses must be successfully completed before higher level courses may be taken, unless special permission is given by the Director of the Dental Hygiene Program.


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BS and AAS degree programs

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