Exercitationes Anatomicae, De Motu Cordis & Sanguinis Circulatione (1661)

William Harvey (1578-1657)

     

Exercitationes Anatomicae, De Motu Cordis & Sanguinis Circulatione (1661)

   

Exercitationes Anatomicae, De Motu Cordis & Sanguinis Circulatione (1661)

     

William Harvey (1578-1657)

Exercitationes Anatomicae, De motu Cordis & Sanguinis Circulatione. Early posthumous edition of Sir William Harvey's classic works on the circulation and generations.

Harvey was a student of the University of Cambridge and the University of Padua, graduating in 1603. In Padua, working under the guidance of Hieronymus Fabricius ab Aquapendente, one of the discoverers of the venous valves, Harvey questioned the accepted dogma of blood moving only through veins, but not arteries, flowing in both directions and having no relationship to pulse.  Upon his return to England, he married the daughter of the physician to Charles I, ensuring his path to become a royal physician.

By 1616, he was well on his way to perfecting his blood circulation theory. He quantified the amount of blood the heart pushed out during one beat, multiplied it by the number of heartbeats a day, and determined that 540 pounds of blood cannot be generated de novo by the liver, the accepted theory. As his skepticism grew, he became more convinced that the blood moved in a circle throughout the body, even though the existence of the capillaries was unknown at the time. This volume was the first published after Harvey’s death in 1557. It is one of the most influential texts in the History of Medicine.

Edititorial notes by Andrew I Spielman.

Digital Versions - TBD